Blog post 13: Photo stories

The National Press Photographers Association has a monthly contest for its members. Looking at the winners in the “Feature/Multiple Picture” category is a great way to learn more about telling a story visually.

This is one of those assignments where you will select one item and write about it. Please dig around and try to find a photo story that really appeals to YOU. I won’t ask you you to post your selected story in advance, but please make an effort to choose one that no one else has written about.

To view the winners and choose one story:

  1. First go to the 2013 winners page and select any link there (R1, R2, etc., stand for regions of North America).
  2. From the region page, select any month.
  3. On the month page, open the link for “Feature/Multiple Picture.” Only this category contains photo stories.
  4. Choose a photo story to write about.

Read more of this post

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Blog post 6: Reading assignment

In this blog post, publish your notes from Kern, chapter 13. Your notes must appear in the form of one (1) numbered list. Write a brief statement above the list to explain or summarize it.

The idea is to highlight or capture the ideas or information that resonated most strongly with you, in a format that other people might find interesting to read.

The list is not meant to represent everything in the chapter. It should represent what was most meaningful to YOU. Thus each student’s list will be different.

From your list, choose ONE of your items and find a story at NPR.org that illustrates or reinforces that point.

  • Include the full headline of the NPR story in your item.
  • Make that headline text a link to the story page at NPR.org.

Write two or three sentences that clearly explain how that NPR story illustrates the point — be sure to indicate clearly WHICH point you’re writing about. Read more of this post

Blog post 5: Reading assignment

In this blog post, publish your notes from Kern, chapters 1 and 2. Your notes must appear in the form of two (2) numbered lists, one for each chapter. Write a brief statement above each list to explain or summarize that list.

This is a legitimate type of blog post (although usually the content would refer and link to another blog post at someone else’s blog). The idea is to highlight or capture the ideas or information that resonated most strongly with you, in a format that other people might find interesting to read.

The list is not meant to represent everything in the chapter. It should represent what was most meaningful to YOU. Thus each student’s list will be different.

In each list, choose ONE of your items and find a story at NPR.org that illustrates or reinforces that point.

  • Include the full headline of the NPR story in your item.
  • Make that headline text a link to the story page at NPR.org.

That’s one link in each list, two different stories. Read more of this post

A nice radio story with just a little reporter voice included

I caught this audio story (5 min.) on Only a Game over the weekend. It’s really well done, I thought — and you should note how little we hear of the reporter’s voice.

The editing is very nice.

The topic is a particular skateboarders’ trick, the McTwist.

One thing to note is that this story was reported and edited by a photojournalist, Andrew Norton. So you need to think about why a photojournalist goes out and learns how to do audio at a professional level. Uh huh. Because now he’s getting paid to put a 5-minute story on NPR.

Oh, and guess what? He was one of the students in the Transom workshop last spring, which produced the projects you critiqued earlier this semester.